Categories
Global Conflict Nutrition Population

Worry over Hunger in Africa

from World Watch magazine

            I have had the good fortune to have visited 5 of the 54 countries in Africa. Each has left me with a strong image.

            When I think of Cairo, Egypt, I think of a man leading a donkey cart with his wife seated inside. After he moved beside the cart to help his wife down, I realized from her contour she had come for a prenatal checkup to the women’s health clinic we were visiting. According to our informant, an English-speaking female gynecologist, over 90% of the women she attended had survived female genital mutilation. I considered the difficulty of this woman, brought by cart, would have when giving birth.

            At dusk Gail and I wandered around Cape Town, South Africa, then walked leisurely to our hotel. A man came from the shadows while passing a park and grabbed my arm with a viselike grip. He asked for money to get home to his “settlement”. When I asked for more information, he produced a neatly typed letter explaining where he lived and how much it would cost to get a ride home. Although usually generous, this smelled of a racket and we walked away after I peeled off his fingers. Many times, especially while reading Trevor Noah’s “Born a Crime”, I have wondered if this poor man really was honest in his need.

            Eswatini (formerly “Swaziland”) was my introduction to Sub-Saharan Africa. I accepted an invitation to go there with trepidation, because of the way SSA is portrayed in the media. However, I felt very comfortable while there. I have many competing images from Eswatini: the healthy twins I helped birth while the mother was lying on a gurney outside; the football-sized tumor I removed from a woman’s pelvis after getting permission from her landlord to do the surgery since women couldn’t give their own consent. Perhaps the strongest image, however, is the skinny cattle on the red, barren land. Because only the royal family, the government and a few elites can own land, cattle are the Swazi people’s wealth.

            I became curious while walking past a small building at the Baptist Medical Centre in Nalerigu, northern Ghana. It turned out to be a clinic where malnourished infants and small children were fed. A parent (usually the mother) stayed with each child; sometime older children would accompany them. Fans turned overhead and mosquito nets hung on empty cribs. Breastfeeding was encouraged, and the older kids were fed nutritious food. In addition to their meals, parents received instruction on food preparation and nutrition.

            A friend convinced me to overcome my revulsion of the Rwandan genocide and go to Kigali for an international conference on family planning. Gail and I discovered a peaceful, clean city where people cooperate despite different ethnicities. The image that sticks in my mind is not what we saw there, but a picture from the article “Remember Rwanda?” published in World Watch magazine. “Cutting the last tree on the lot” shows a barren background with 3 people watching, and is emblematic of over-usage of natural resources. One theory of the root cause of the genocide is poverty combined with more people than the land could bear.

            These 5 countries are arranged above in order by current average per capita annual income. They go from $3569 in Egypt down to an incredibly low $798 in Rwanda, according to the World Bank.

            Some individuals worry that White people’s concern over rapid population growth in Africa is motivated by racism. Some point out that the footprint of a person in Africa is much smaller than our own, so Africans should be able to have larger families. However, the average number of children an African woman births is over 4, which means the population will double in just 28 years if growth continues at the present rate. Already there are food shortages in many places in Africa. In order to prevent famine and even possible future genocide, I feel that some African countries need to slow population growth. We can help with education and making contraception available to all. Next month I’ll write about an African success!

© Richard Grossman MD, 2022

Categories
Action Global Conflict

Repudiate the Doctrine of Discovery

Our friend has spoken of the barbarities [extreme cruelties] which have been practiced towards the Indians, and of their present condition of degradation in contrast with their condition when William Penn landed on this continent.

Lucretia Mott, 1869

 

After showing the film “Two Who Dared” about the Sharps, a Unitarian couple who saved thousands of children from the Nazis, Charlie Clements asked for questions. I stood and asked what current conditions are analogous to German fascism that should spur us to action.

Charlie cited Darfur. This region of Sudan has been at war for a decade now, with three hundred thousand people slaughtered. It is not the usual genocide, however, where the conflict is based on religion or race. The two warring parties are both Muslims and of similar ethnicity, but one group is semi-nomadic and the other sedentary agriculturalists. Theoretically these two groups should coexist peacefully, but that is far from the case in Darfur! It seems that this conflict is over resources in that sparse land.

Right after asking Charlie my question, I thought of another situation analogous to Nazi Germany. This human tragedy is closer to home, however.

Our European forbearers invaded a prosperous land that supported its indigenous population very well. Native Americans helped some of the European settlers when they first arrived. How did we thank them? by uprooting them, waging devastating wars and introducing fatal diseases.

Using both bullets and disease, the European invaders killed off 80 or 90% of Native Americans. We came close to wiping out the people who had first rights to North and South America.

How could the medieval Europeans justify this massacre? The roots of this tragedy go back to the first half of the second millennium of Christianity. The Roman Catholic Church’s policy at that time was forced conversion of infidels (and of other enemies). Sometimes conversion was bypassed and the poor souls were killed directly. The Church ruled with fear and an iron fist.

Intolerance of diversity affected many groups. Fanaticism inspired the Crusades, resulting in the massacre of millions of Muslims. The last, Albigensian

Crusade was in Europe, against the Cathars, a Christian sect who protested the power of the Church. Cathars were obliterated in 1244 with the burning of the last 200+ of these protestants.

A single religious policy, the Doctrine of Discovery, made the conquering and massacre of Native Americans possible. Indeed, this Doctrine made it imperative that Christian Europeans conquer and convert in the name of Jesus. To quote Pope Nicholas V’s Papal Bull Romanus Pontifex of 1455, European monarchs were “…to invade, capture, vanquish, and subdue all Saracens and pagans and other enemies of Christ… to reduce their persons to perpetual slavery [and] to take away all their possessions and property….”

In 1823 the US Supreme Court upheld the continued right of Europeans to own and control property that once belonged to Indians in the case of Johnson v. M’Intosh. The Court maintained that the US Government, as the discovering sovereign’s successor, does have the right to nullify Indians’ interest in their lands. Thus indigenous people had no right to their own lands! This Doctrine became the cornerstone of USA Indian policy and was the basis for a Court decision as recently as 2005.

The world has changed vastly since 1455. Both the Church and secular laws have changed immeasurably. Our society is much more egalitarian; now every person has value. By today’s standards many of the dirty deeds that the Europeans did would be unconscionable. We should be careful not to judge the past by today’s values, but also must be sure that today’s laws and practices don’t perpetuate the dark past.

What should we of European descent do to make it right with Native Americans? It is impossible for us to provide complete recompense; too much has happened since 1492. For instance, many of European descent live on land formerly used by the Utes, and we are unwilling and unable to move.

            A first step is to become aware of past history. I don’t remember learning about the Doctrine of Discovery in school, yet it is a vital part of history. A public apology is in order; this essay is my personal apology. I understand that there are treaties between the Federal Government and Native Americans that the government has consistently broken. We should ask Washington to live up to its promises to our indigenous hosts. Finally, we must work to prevent similar unethical policies that lead to genocide.

                                           © Richard Grossman MD, 2013